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Фото. Русские оккупанты в Азии. Фотографии издевательств и карательных акций на базах

Простые фотографии о присутствии русских. Последствия.

Every shade of beige: Soviet-era sanatoriums – in pictures | Cities

Maryam Omidi

Aurora­­, Kyrgyzstan

The ship-shaped, brutalist Aurora was built in 1979 for the communist party elite. At that time more than 350 employees tended to every need of the 200 or so guests. ‘From the moment they opened their eyes in the morning, they were surrounded by the best doctors,’ says Erkinbek Borubaev, the sanatorium’s deputy director. Some claim the sanatorium was named after the battleship that fired the first shot in the 1917 Bolshevik revolution, while others contend that architect Yuri Nikolaevich Minaev drew inspiration from The White Ship, a novel by Kyrgyz author Chingiz Aitmatov

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Aurora

­­Parafin wax is applied to the body to relieve the symptoms of arthritis

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Aurora

A patient receives electromagnetic therapy on her legs to treat varicose ulcers and chronic pain

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Aurora

Ultraviolet light-emitting sterilisation lamps are placed in the ear, nose or throat to kill bacteria, viruses and fungi

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Aurora

A Kyrgyz wrestler takes a swim in the pool before visiting the gym for a workout

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Khoja Obi Garm, Tajikistan

Nestled high in the Gissar mountain range, Khoja Obi Garm is a colossal concrete mass. Guests travel from all over the country to what they refer to as the ‘magic mountain’, where radon water flows from several underground sources. While radon has received bad press in the west as a possible cause of lung cancer, it is also acknowledged to have analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. At Khoja Obi Garm it is seen as a panacea for all ills, including arthritis, blood pressure and infertility

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Khoja Obi Garm

Sharaf Naziruf, a young doctor, who at almost 2 metres tall towers over most Tajiks, jokingly points to his height as evidence of the water’s health benefits. ‘I grew up with this water, we played in it as kids. We showered in it and washed our dishes in it.’ For those unconvinced by the marvels of radon, other treatments such as the ‘electrical hot chair’ and ‘friction and shaking with medical electrical equipment’ are also on offer

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Khoja Obi Garm

Potted plants line the entrance to the physiotherapy room

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Khoja Obi Garm

A man recuperates after a visit to the steam room

Photograph: Michal Solarski

Zaamin, Uzbekistan

Located in the Zaamin National Park 2,000m above sea level, the sanatorium opened in 1988. Its construction was financed by trade unions from each of the Soviet republics

Photograph: Egor Rogalev

Zaamin

Inhalation equipment is used to ease the symptoms of respiratory diseases

Photograph: Egor Rogalev

Zaamin

In the halotherapy (salt treatment) room, guests use towels and blankets to prevent hair and clothing from being covered by a fine layer of salt

Photograph: Egor Rogalev

Blue Issyk-Kul­­, Kyrgyzstan

The sanatorium was built in 1965 after the discovery of local mud with reputed healing properties. At its summertime peak the sanatorium houses 1,000 people, mainly second world war veterans and pensioners who are treated free of charge for stays of up to three weeks

Photograph: René Fietzek

Blue Issyk-Kul

Depending on a patient’s ailment, mud is slathered over the appropriate area of the body – including the teeth and gums

Photograph: René Fietzek

Blue Issyk-Kul­­

The mud is washed off after 20 minutes

Photograph: René Fietzek

Blue Issyk-Kul­­

Communal areas provide visitors with spaces to sit and drink tea while chatting with other guests

Photograph: René Fietzek

Alatau­­­, Kazakhstan

Despite its vast area – about the size of western Europe – Kazakhstan did not have a significant sanatorium until the construction of Alatau in 1984. Nestling in the mountains a short ride from Almaty, the sanatorium boasts a lake known as the ‘Dead Sea of Kazakhstan’ because of its high salinity. Guests travel from across the country to float in its still waters

Photograph: Rene Fietzek

Alatau

A patient takes a revitalising oxygen bath

Photograph: Rene Fietzek

Jeti-Ögüz­­, Kyrgyzstan

As well as offering radon and hydrogen-sulphide treatments using local spring water, Jeti-Ögüz is one of the few remaining post-Soviet sanatoriums to offer kumis – a drink made from fermented mare’s milk, reputedly good for chronic diseases including tuberculosis and bronchitis

Photograph: Michal Solarski

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#оккупант #Азия #русские


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